Posts tagged as:

roller

A retractable baby gate combines safety with convenience. Using a polyester mesh screen that pulls across the doorway on which it’s installed, retractable baby gates operate in a similar fashion to window shades, but laterally instead of vertically, and locking to a mount installed at the opposite end.

Since these baby gates pull across to a desired length, they’re capable of handling most doorway widths. There are wide and extra wide baby gate products available if your doorway is exceptionally wide. Typical retractable baby gates are designed to handle 42-72″ openings, and range between 30 and 34 inches in height, which should be more than sufficient to prevent toddlers from climbing over them. On the other hand, while the mesh screen is taut when stretched across a doorway, the material is still flexible, and in most cases should not be used at the top of stairs.

Some retractable baby safety gate products marketed as baby stair gates are newer or different designs, and may be suitable for their advertised purpose. Some “retractable” gates are actually older designs, like accordion gates, which use wood lattices to expand and contract. An accordion baby gate is not recommended, as it presents a danger to fingers and limbs when closing and opening. True retractable baby safety gates with mesh screens are often called rollers to distinguish them from other designs.

These rollers are compact alternatives to swinging baby gates, and are ideal for rooms with limited floor space, since they don’t arc outward from the doorway. When retracted, the rolled-up screen extends less than half a foot, so there’s no need to store it elsewhere when not in use.

Some retractable gates only rewind manually with a knob, which may not be an issue for many owners. In many cases, it’s not necessary to fully retract the screen when entering or exiting the room; it only needs to be briefly taken off the mount, then put back. Other models have automatic rewind mechanisms that retract the screen once the locking mechanism is released. This is idea for avoiding the trip hazards of an unmounted, unretracted screen that hangs limp across the doorway.

Most retractable baby gates only have a couple of drawbacks. They have a reputation for being noisy while extending and rewinding, which can be an issue when checking in on a sleeping baby. They’re also rarely the instant install that manufacturers advertise them to be, unlike some pressure-mounted gates. The components usually have to be screwed into the wall of the doorway, which isn’t a complicated process, but it definitely falls into the “some assembly required” category.

{ Comments on this entry are closed }